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8330x2 + 7350, jitter resistance?

zym1010, modified 1 Year ago.

8330x2 + 7350, jitter resistance?

Youngling Posts: 2 Join Date: 8/28/20 Recent Posts

EDIT: after a more thorough searching, the answer seems to have been already there since 6 years ago. https://community.genelec.com/forum/-/message_boards/message/920384#_com_liferay_message_boards_web_portlet_MBPortlet_message_920398

 

 

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this is a bit relevant to https://www.community.genelec.com/forum/-/message_boards/message/913050

 

right now, my setup is as follows, for my end-game music listening.

 

Mac -> Thunderbolt 3 Dock with TOSLINK output (Caldigit TS3 Plus, with 15 ports including a TOSLINK) -> Hosa ODL-312 TOSLINK to AES converter -> 7350's Digital In -> 8330s.

 

As l did more research around digital audio technology, I'm now a bit worried if the jitter in the AES signal from the Hosa converter as well as my consumer-level dock can be a problem.

Based on what ilkka-rissanen said before, "The speaker always uses its own clock.". Does that mean, the speaker will read input signal, figure out the sampling rate, reject jitter (of reasonable size, of course)  in the input, and regenerates a new signal using its own clock, presumably with small enough jitter so that all distortion caused by the speaker's internal clock is within spec?

Based on my current experiments, I think the answer to my question should be "YES", but I'm not sure.

thx!

nachjos, modified 1 Year ago.

RE: 8330x2 + 7350, jitter resistance?

Padawan Posts: 41 Join Date: 10/21/16 Recent Posts

I‘m interested in this answer too, because I am using a Mutec mc-3+ smart clock usb in front of my Genelec 8351B, primary for switching digital sources, but it does also a high quality audio re-clocking, and to my ears it improves the sound compares to a direct connection to my Aries G2 AES output.

Probably somebody from Genelec can clarify this. In my opinion a better clocked input signal can always improve sound quality, otherwise there would be no differences in digital sources.