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How to interpret graphs in GLM PC software

nicholas-g, modified 6 Years ago.

How to interpret graphs in GLM PC software

Padawan Posts: 29 Join Date: 11/4/15 Recent Posts


Do you have a document that help explain the graphs generated by the GLM software for each speaker?

I'm interested in what each colour means. It would also be interesting to know if the peaks and troughs suggest what physical changes should be made to a room to get a flatter response.

Thanks,
Nicholas
daiyama, modified 6 Years ago.

Re: How to interpret graphs in GLM PC software

Padawan Posts: 73 Join Date: 1/4/16 Recent Posts
Nicholas,
the red curve is your frequnecy response curve of your speakers in your room measured by the GLM system.
Blue is the filter curve which is applied to the speakers in order to achive the the green curve.
So the green curve is your theoretical room response curve after filter settings by GLM software.

What you can see is that your standing waves in the bass reion (@50Hz, 100Hz and 110 Hz) are handled very well by the software.
You can always help the software by damping your room using basotec or styrofoam absorber.
But you need quite thick layers of this material and either professional help or you have to read a lot about this stuff to make it right (I also know only the tip of the iceberg ;) ). And you need to be able to measure your frequency curve independend from the GLM system. Because you can also "over" damping your room and than it also does not sound so good.

The dips at 60Hz and 80Hz is due to cancelation of standing waves at the position were the mic was measuring.
These dips connot be flattened by the GLM software because you would require quite high energy to "fill up these valleys" which could very fast lead to overload of your speakers.
If you have a 2.1 or 2.2 you can try to move around the subwoofers so they might equalize a bit the peaks and dips (bass array).
If you have 2.0 only you can try to change your listening position (together with your speakers).
If all this does not help, again damping is what you have to do.

Cheers

Knut
nicholas-g, modified 6 Years ago.

Re: How to interpret graphs in GLM PC software

Padawan Posts: 29 Join Date: 11/4/15 Recent Posts
Ilkka,

I have an unusual request. Could you change the colors of the red and green lines to something else. I (like around 5% of men) have red-green color blindness, so both lines look almost the same to me :-(

It might also be cool to export the graph somehow to allow the user to print a large version of it.

Thanks,
Nicholas
ilkka-rissanen, modified 6 Years ago.

Re: How to interpret graphs in GLM PC software

Yoda Posts: 2564 Join Date: 3/23/09 Recent Posts
Hi Nicholas,

Thank you for the request, we will consider what could be done to help you. :)