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Why has Genelc more treble in the sound compare to other?

microkorg, modified 8 Years ago.

Why has Genelc more treble in the sound compare to other?

Youngling Posts: 4 Join Date: 10/19/14 Recent Posts
I have listened to the entire G-series and I think it has more treble compared to others. Is that how it should sound, or is it me hear wrong?
ilkka-rissanen, modified 8 Years ago.

Re: Why has Genelc more treble in the sound compare to other

Yoda Posts: 2564 Join Date: 3/23/09 Recent Posts
Hi,

Could you specify more accurately what you mean by "others"? Other brand speakers, other Genelec speakers, or what?
microkorg, modified 8 Years ago.

Re: Why has Genelc more treble in the sound compare to other

Youngling Posts: 4 Join Date: 10/19/14 Recent Posts
I have compared Genelec G four with Dynaudio Focus 160
ilkka-rissanen, modified 8 Years ago.

Re: Why has Genelc more treble in the sound compare to other

Yoda Posts: 2564 Join Date: 3/23/09 Recent Posts
Hi,

http://www.genelec.com/faq/general/60-w ... e-monitor/

What is GENELEC's goal when designing an active monitor?

Our design philosophy aims to cope with the following requirements:

[*:3u60yk6i]Studio monitor speakers must tell the truth[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]It must not add anything not already present in the signal, neither should it remove anything from it[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]It should be adaptable to different locations, must be reliable and be able to handle the heavy use required in professional audio[/*:m:3u60yk6i]


As with any other engineering solution in the physical real world there are design tradeoffs and the challenge in the design of a professional monitor balances the following parameters:

[*:3u60yk6i]Cabinet size[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]Low frequency cut-off, f-3dB[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]Maximum sound pressure level output[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]Sensitivity[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]Distortion[/*:m:3u60yk6i]
[*:3u60yk6i]Cost[/*:m:3u60yk6i]


Note that sound quality is not a matter open for discussion - it must not be compromised.
ilkka-rissanen, modified 8 Years ago.

Re: Why has Genelc more treble in the sound compare to other

Yoda Posts: 2564 Join Date: 3/23/09 Recent Posts
http://www.genelec.com/faq/acoustical/4 ... -position/

What should be the target response of a monitoring system at the listening position?

First, the role of a monitoring system is to reproduce sound without adding or taking anything away from the original input signal. The reason for such a definition is that the human hearing features a phenomenon called Auditory Masking* and that modern recording systems have a flat electronic frequency response. So, to accurately monitor what is recorded on the hard drive or tape machine, the monitoring system must also have a flat response at the listening position.

Secondly, onto the often quoted "final mix translation" issue, one can observe that domestic and car audio systems are generally improving over time and having better, i.e. flatter, frequency response. As a general note, a good mix should sound good on any system. The average of many different reproduction systems actually tends towards a flat frequency response.

The above arguments lead to the conclusion that a monitoring system must somehow yield a flat response at the listening position. Genelec monitors have a flat response in anechoic conditions. When the monitors are placed into a listening room, their response changes and the built-in Room Response Controls can be used to retrieve a flat response at listening position.

One exception to this rule is the X-Curves as used in the movie industry. Movie theatre replay systems are installed in very large rooms (e.g. a movie theatre for 200-800 people) and the frequency response across the audience area is never flat. The Dubbing Stage must replicate this response so that the mix translates precisely to the Movie Theatre. Note that the soundtracks for the release of movies on DVD's are re-mixed on flat response monitoring systems for reproduction in domestic environments.

Note*: Humans do not have the ability to hear minute differences in frequency. For example, it is very difficult to discern a 1000 Hz signal from one that is 1001 Hz. This becomes even more difficult if the two signals are playing at the same time. Furthermore, the 1000 Hz signal would also affect a human's ability to hear a signal that is 1010 Hz, 1100 Hz or 990 Hz. This concept is known as Auditory Masking. If the 1000 Hz signal is strong, it will mask signals at nearby frequencies, making them inaudible to the listener. For a masked signal to be heard, its power will need to be increased to a level greater than that of a threshold that is determined by the frequency of the masker tone and its strength. Related to monitoring system frequency response, it means that any strong irregularities in such frequency response (i.e. significant bumps) will generate masking of nearby frequencies and hence degradation of the sound reproduction.